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md mukter
Jul 16, 2022
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use the more international "thank you/thanks" and "bye" instead of using these words to express it, perhaps because they are afraid that Hong Kong people will not understand. Therefore, this word has not entered the English vocabulary of Hong clipping path service Kong. The older generation of English teachers in Hong Kong will also say "cheerio" to mean goodbye, or "class dismissed" to mean class dismissed. These are or old school English, which is not often heard in the UK these days. "Cheers" is like a universal key that can be used in several situations. It's a bit like the Cantonese "you should", which can express "please", "thank you" and "sorry", but it cannot be used as a goodbye. Finnish also doesn't have the word "please", "kiitos" means "please" and "thank you". The word "Cheers" should be taught by foreign English teachers, because living in the UK, or in British movies and novels, they often encounter them, and they can say it no less than ten times a day. They play different roles in different scenes, and each The roles are all equally important. Just as we are the children of our parents, the parents of our children, the boss or subordinate of others in the company, and the friend of others, each identity is unique and has the same value. Just like saying "cheers" on different occasions, or expressing gratitude, or saying goodbye, or clinking glasses, it is an indispensable part of connecting with people. There is no synonym for "cheers" in German, and the three explanations have their own expressions. It is a pity that there is no universal plug. Germans who have lived in the UK like to use "cheers" when they come back. When I hear Germans using this word with me, I know that they must have
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